Vis

The island of Vis lies further offshore than any of the other inhabited Adriatic islands, which perhaps explains why it less developed in terms of tourism than the islands which are closer to the mainland coast. The Greek colony of Issa was founded here in 397 BC and some notable artefacts including a fine bronze head of Aphrodite have been found on the island. It’s an attractive island with dramatic mountain scenery, some interesting historical relics and two appealing towns – Vis and Komiza. 

To the west lies Bisevo, famous as the location of the Blue Cave. Vis Town is a sedate arc of grey-brown houses stretching around a bay and is a popular overnight stop-off for visiting yachtspeople on a Vis boat charter. The standard of restaurants is high and Vis is something of a gourmet hotspot, with a reputation for serving the best and freshest fish in Croatia. 

Local culinary trademarks include Pogace od Srdele (anchovy pasty), Viski hib (a sweet slab of compressed figs and herbs) and some fine local wines (Vugava – white and Viski plavac – red.) If you have time to squeeze in some sight-seeing in between meals, explore the suburb of Kut, a sixteenth century tangle of narrow-cobbled streets overlooked by the grand summer houses built by the nobility of Hvar with their aristocratic stone balconies and staircases.  There’s also an ancient Greek cemetery, the remains of some Roman baths, a graceful Franciscan monastery and the George the Third Fortress, built by the British in 1813 to guard the entrance to Vis harbor.
 

 

Mooring:

  • Arrive early to avoid disappointment – Vis gets crowded, particularly in high summer. 
  • Tie up bow- or stern-to in the visitors’ berth on the south-west side of the harbour. Pick-up lines are provided.

To Do:

  • Visit the Blue Cave on the islet of Bisevo
  • Explore Kut, where the nobles of Hvar built their elegant summer houses
  • Eat and drink well!

Facilities:

  • Water
  • Electricity
  • Fuel
  • Provisions
  • Fruit and vegetable market
  • Bars and restaurants