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Cavtat

Twelve miles ( 20 kilometers) south of Dubrovnik lies the historic town of Cavtat, built on the ruins of the ancient Greek settlement of Epidaurus and destroyed by the Slavs in the seventh century AD.  The inhabitants fled to Dubrovnik, where they founded what was later to become a powerful city state. Cavtat is an attractive town, awash with traditional stone architecture and fringed by lush Mediterranean vegetation. The pretty fishing village was discovered by vacationers from the Austro-Hungarian empire at the beginning of the twentieth century and has been a popular resort ever since.

The Riva is the palm-lined stretch of the Old Town which straddles the ridge behind the waterfront and its dotted with cafes serving salads, sandwiches and ice-cream by day and cocktails by night. Cavtat has a good selection of restaurants, mostly near the waterfront, serving everything from pizza to more elaborate seafood dishes.

Along the Riva, some of the sights to be seen on a Cavtat yacht charter include St Nicholas’s Church and the adjacent museum that features a gruesome St. Sebastian by Benedetto Gennari and the Vlaho Bukovac Gallery - a good overview of the artist’s work including the lucrative society portraits which made his name. The Monastery of Our Lady of the Snow has a few Renaissance gems that will be of interest to art-buffs and the imposing Racic Mausoleum, built by Ivan Mestrovic in 1921 for one of the local ship-owning families. A few shingle beaches lie to the east of the town center and there are quieter swimming spots at the far end of the peninsula, ten minutes walk from the center of town.

 

Mooring:

  • Go bow- or stern-to the quay in Cavtat, where the depth ranges from 3 – 13 feet (1 – 4 meters).
  • Alternatively, anchor in the southern part of the bay.
  • If there are strong NW or W winds, shelter in Uvala Tiha on the other side of the bay.

To Do:

  • Visit the museums and galleries of the town.

Facilities:

  • Bars and restaurants
  • Water
  • Provisions